Is the Nike’s Vaporfly 4% fair or unfair?

How to Get the Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4% 1
Nike’s Vaporfly 4% shoe
Here is an interesting view from a runner and writer on the Nike’s Vaporfly 4% shoe on whether it is fair in the spirit fair competition, whether the technology behind the foam and the carbon-fiber plate is legal and whether its price makes it “reasonably available” to all athletes.

Ian Riordan of the Irish Times is preparing to run the Dublin marathon in October and has already bought a pair of the Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4%.

“Today is the first day of my competitive running comeback. It’s all building towards a proper assault at a personal record time in the Dublin Marathon in October, and I know Eliud Kipchoge is losing a lot of sleep over that,” wrote Ian.



He is ensuring “no stone left unturned – and no expense spared”. According to him, there are no

World recorld holder, Joyciline Jepkosgei to debut at the Hamburg Marathon in April

Joyciline Jepkosgei after setting a new world record in Prague

This year’s Hamburg marathon is worth waiting for. It is shaping up to be one of the biggest marathons to look forward to in April, with so many high profile long distance stars already getting enlisted to run.




Before more names can come out soon, here is the recent press release from the organizers of the marathon on the women’s half marathon record holder.

World half marathon record holder Joyciline Jepkosgei will make her eagerly awaited marathon debut at the Haspa Marathon Hamburg on 28 April.

Best running jokes

Runners running  half marathon in Eldoret, Kenya
Below are a number of the best running-related jokes that I was able to compile from different places on the internet:




The truth is you can always run faster, but sometimes the truth hurts.
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Two Hunters: Two hunters are walking through a forest looking for deer when all of a sudden; a giant bear jumps out and scares them. They drop their guns and run. One of the hunters stopped, opened up his backpack and laced up a pair of running shoes. His buddy looked at him and said, "What are you doing? Are you crazy? You can't outrun the bear!" To this the hunter said, "I know, all I have to do is outrun you!"

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The trouble with jogging is that by the time you realize you're not in shape for it, it's too far to walk back.

Records fall as Ngeno, Matanga triumph at Safi International Half Marathon

Bernard Kipkorir Ngeno winning the 2019 Safi International Half Marathon
Below is the report from the organisers concerning the big race today in Morocco.

Kenya’s Bernard Kipkorir Ngeno and Tanzania’s Failuna Abdi Matanga reigned supreme at the Safi International Half Marathon on Sunday (24), smashing the course records with respective winning times of 1:01:06 and 1:10:50.

On a day of glorious sunshine on the Moroccan coast, when thousands of runners, young and old, took to the streets of the port city, it was Ngeno and Matanga who coped best with the undulating course.



Ngeno entered the race as favourite for the men’s title, coming off a 59:22 clocking in Valencia last year and victory at the Bomet Half Marathon in Kenya last weekend. “I knew I would win, I’m in good shape,” the 22-year-old said moments after crossing the line in Safi.

Kenyan athletes promised free medical check-up and 50% discount on treatment during launch of statues in Eldoret


Two historical days unfolded consecutively in Eldoret town, the city of Champions. On the 22nd of February 2019, statues of Kenyan athletes were unveiled along the Nairobi-Eldoret higway at a junction that appears to be the gate to Eldoret town. This is probably the first time that such statues to recognize athletes that have given so much glory to the Kenyan nation are being set up anywhere in the country. 



On the 23rd would be the first time that the national cross country championships, referred by some speakers during the launch of the statues as the “semi-finals of the world cross country championships,” will also be done here.

Hiwot Ayalew set to star in Safi international half marathon

Bernard Ngeno and Hiwot Ayalew
Here is another press release from the organizers of the Safi International half marathon:



Safi, Morocco, February 22, 2019 - The journey to marathon success is a long and winding road, and for Kenya’s Bernard Ngeno and Ethiopia’s Hiwot Ayalew, it runs through Safi – a port city of 300,000 that sits on Morocco’s scenic Atlantic coast.

Bernard Ngeno and Diane Nukuri to headline Safi International Half Marathon

Bernard Ngeno winning the Bomet County half marathon
Fresh from winning the Bomet County half marathon this past weekend in Kenya, Bernard Ngeno will be heading to Morrocco for the Safi International Marathon on Sunday.

Below is a press release from the organizers of the race.

Safi, Morocco, February 9, 2019 - A high-calibre field spanning 10 different nationalities is set to take to the streets alongside Morocco’s Atlantic Coast for the Safi International Half Marathon next Sunday, February 24.

Competitive athletes are 30 years younger than their peers; study finds


A section of Kenyan Masters' athletes attending the world masters event in Australia
Often, while one walks around with some runners and comes across some of their former primary or high school classmates, they would hardly believe that they are the same ages judging from the way they look.

Well, according to an article in the New York Times, a study has found that regular exercises can keep one 30 years “younger” than their peers.



It claims; the muscles of older men and women who have exercised for decades are indistinguishable in many ways from those of healthy 25-year-olds, according to an uplifting new study of a group of active septuagenarians.

Kenyan athletes may change their citizenships for the benefit of all; other Kenyans, shoe companies, new nations, etc

Kenyan born Bernard Lagat representing the USA at the IAAF world championships in Daegu

It is understandable when some international road races set some parallel prize money structures to reward runners from their countries as a way to encourage upcoming runners from their nations too. This will clearly encourage some healthy competition among the locals and in the long run strengthen the nation’s runners to be at the same competitive level as the international runners (Kenyans and Ethiopians, mostly).

It is also understandable when some running shoes and apparel companies just choose to sponsor runners from a certain region on the continent with the claim that their stores are located in their countries and that they feel the athletes from such places would best help represent and market their brands there.

It is also quite understandable and only natural that one would want to see a countryman, even a relative, or someone close to you win a major race in your country. But, it should be encouraged to happen in a fair manner. Ways should not be devised to have only a few selected runners compete against those they believe they have a better chance of beating if the spirit of sport is to be maintained.

Runners will often try to find other reasons besides their lack of sufficient hard work, to explain why they were beaten in a race.

The origin of an athlete should definitely never be an excuse!



Turkey, Bahrain, Belgium, Qatar, South Korea, Israel, Sweden, The USA, and many other countries have been taking runners with East African origin, especially Kenyans and Ethiopians, to represent their nations in inter-continental competitions, Olympic Games and world championships.
But, it is not just runners who acquire new citizenships.

What I like about my Garmin Forerunner 235 GPS watch

A capture of my training from Garmin Connect

A good running shoe, apparel and wrist watch is what every serious runner should have in their training. I have been using the Garmin forerunner 235 for my training since February 2018, which is over a year now. And, since I am not sponsored by any watch brand I will give an honest review as to what I like about this watch and what ought to be added.



Below is what I like:

Origin versus Talent; my new ebook


In recent times, there have been instances when some running fans, and even the media, have given much focus on the origin of athletes rather than on their achievements. It has reached a time that when an athlete runs such an amazing time for a marathon, it won’t be worth celebrating if it was run by a runner from a certain origin, but will be treated as a phenomenal achievement if run by another from a different origin.



Should a runner be awarded for crossing the finish line first, or for having been born in a certain region? Should runners have political boundaries, or should they see each other as an international community? Should runners from countries with other successful runners be disadvantaged in races to “level” the playing field? Is there a problem when runners with Kenyan, or Ethiopian, origin seek to represent other nations that they have already acquired new citizenships?
There are some friends and even neighbors I personally know who already went out to represent other nations. But it has always been a win-win situation for their families and communities here in Kenya as well as for their new countries of citizenship. These runners have ended up earning a good living out of their talents, are now well-off financially able to educate their immediate families and have helped their communities in many positive ways.
This ebook ponders about this topic in an elaborate way.